I Promise You an Herb Garden

When I told one of my dear friends that I was feeling a bit blah lately, she surprised me with a cute herb growing kit to cheer me up! I was touched by the caring gesture, but I couldn’t help but feel a twinge of trepidation, too. What if… the herbs don’t grow?

My maternal grandmother had a green thumb, but unfortunately for me, it’s not hereditary! My previous failed attempts at keeping even low-maintenance house plants alive discouraged me from developing a deep interest in gardening.

In my household, it’s my patient husband who tends to our little backyard garden. For the most part, I help by staying out of the way. But when the time comes to rake and collect all of the fallen crunchy leaves, I’m happy to do it!

As for the herb growing kit, I’m going to follow the instructions to the letter. I want my herb garden to grow!

top: basilic, coriandre
center: ciboulette
bottom: persil, thym

If it doesn’t grow, at least I can say my French vocabulary grew by five words:

basil: basilic

chives: ciboulette

cilantro: coriandre

parsley: persil

thyme: thym

Another way to say chives in French is civette, which sounds like civet, the cat-like mammal found mainly in Southeast Asia. For clarification, I asked my dear friend in Toulouse which word he uses for chives and he said ciboulette — so that’s the one I’m going with, too!

Sowed on June 9, 2021

Wish me luck! 🌱

Do you like gardening? Tell me in the comments below!

French-Canadian Film: “Modified”

I recently attended a community screening of Modified, a French-Canadian documentary about “a food lover’s journey into GMOs,” or genetically modified/engineered organisms.

Regardless of where you stand on the issue, this film is a must-see for anyone who eats food. So, yes, it’s for everyone!

In the 90-minute award-winning film, filmmaker, Aube Giroux, takes viewers on her journey as she tries to understand why over 60 countries label their genetically modified food, while countries, like Canada and the United States, do not.

Traveling from Québec and Nova Scotia, Canada to Paris, France, then to Davis and San Francisco, California, followed by stops in Washington, DC, and Montpelier, Vermont, she interviews small town farmers and big city university agricultural engineering professors. She also shares her frustration with government health officials who refuse to discuss GMOs.

In between scenes, she is shown using fresh ingredients to make a few dishes, like mouthwatering pear crisp with oatmeal topping, a savory cherry tomato galette, and a hearty green pasta, while soft French music plays in the background.

Aube Giroux credits her mother for igniting her passion for home cooked meals made with garden-grown ingredients. The clips of old home movies featuring her jovial mother will tug at your heartstrings.

Visit http://www.modifiedthefilm.com to watch the film’s trailer.

at the screening, we were given these movie postcards